The Seven Keys Of Natural Life

Like Mark On Facebook or Follow On Twitter

Mark Lundegren

I have a new book, The Seven Keys of Natural Life, that I would like to personally invite you to learn more about. It’s available on Amazon in e-book and print editions, including a free preview. The book summarizes my seven Natural Strategy workshops, which guide the progressive mastery of modern life through conscious and informed natural functioning.

Overall, The Seven Keys spans three crucial areas, each enabling richer and more adaptive modern life today: 1) essential material from my seven personal and collective workshops presented in a self-paced format, 2) a step-by-step guide to creating transformative Natural Strategy plans for both individuals and groups, and 3) exploration of the science and principles behind my workshops and larger Natural Strategy method.

Seven Keys Of Natural LifeIncluded in The Seven Keys are over 250 graphical exhibits, tools, and models, helping you to understand and then master the Natural Strategy method and the book’s seven action areas, or keys, for Natural Life.

Importantly, this last term describes our new modern potential to consciously harness and accelerate natural evolutionary processes for our personal and collective benefit. Accelerated natural adaptation and evolution, or health-increasing natural progressivity, is the overarching focus of The Seven Keys, my Natural Strategy method, and my work in total. In its essence, Natural Life is the work of nature made self-aware and powerfully brought to the various tasks and demands of modern life.

If you are interested in our now waiting potential for conscious, vibrant, and intentionally accelerated natural evolution – and thus for renaturalized modern life and greater fulfillment of our natural potential as modern people – The Seven Keys will likely be quite compelling. At its core, The Seven Keys offers a transformative new way of looking at evolving life, understanding its essential lessons for modern people and groups, and guiding our lives and collectives toward ever-increasing natural vitality, adaptiveness, and success.

Thanks to the power of internet-based publishing, The Seven Keys is available in a number of low-cost editions, including availability at local libraries. As the book’s jacket overview states, The Seven Keys is indeed “brimming with ideas for new natural, personal, and collective awareness and vitality in our time,” and I hope you will seek it out.

Health & best wishes,

Mark

Tell others about Mark and the transformative Natural Strategy method!

Strategy Basics: Measuring Health

Like Mark On Facebook or Follow On Twitter

Mark Lundegren

As you may know, I am in the final stages of preparing a book for publication, one that spans my seven Natural Strategy workshops.

An important theme in the book, and in my Natural Strategy method overall, is the idea that new health awareness can greatly and naturally improve our functioning, as individuals and groups of all kinds. Practically, a telling indicator of adequate health awareness is our ability to engage in progressive or increasingly rigorous and useful health measurement.

As is perhaps the case for you right now, both ideas are often unclear or uncertain proposals today, especially when first introduced. I would therefore like to spend a moment helping you to better understand the critical topics of health and its measurement, as an introduction to my Natural Strategy method, my workshops and upcoming book, and an important tool that you can immediately use.

Understanding Health

Let’s begin with a fairly simple definition of health. But let me also prepare you in advance for this definition. While simple, the definition may be new and unfamiliar, it is quite sweeping, and it may take time for you to consider.

Most of us of course use the term health all the time. But often we do not think carefully about what this word means. Because of health’s natural importance, and even its central role in natural functioning, I would encourage you to reflect on the idea of health more deeply than you might otherwise. Let me help you in this process with a question: if I characterized you, another person, a plant or animal, an organization, or a whole society as healthy, unhealthy, healthier, or less healthy, what do or might these words communicate?

Continue reading “Strategy Basics: Measuring Health”

When We Know But Don’t Act

Like Mark On Facebook or Follow On Twitter

Mark LundegrenAfter almost two years of work, I’ve nearly finished a book spanning my seven Natural Strategy workshops. All that’s left is a last look at the introduction and a final proofread of the book overall (though this may take some time).

This last bit of effort, however, requires some distance from the project and a fresh set of eyes. So I’m spending some of the summer on vacation and away from this work.

Knowing Versus Acting

As People or Groups, We Can Know, Act, Do Both, or Do Neither         full-size

Since it will be several weeks before I will post here again, and several more weeks after that until I can begin to post regularly, let me share an idea from my book before I head out for a summer adventure. Hopefully, this idea will engage you until I am back. And really, it is an idea that we can use over a lifetime and in many domains, if we want.

As summarized in the graphic above, the idea I want to share is that we can – and should, if we seek more optimal life and work – learn to better separate and examine our instances and potential states of knowing and acting. You no doubt understand the concepts of knowledge and action, so I won’t spend time on definitions m here. Instead, I would like to move right to a personal learning challenge to you.

Continue reading “When We Know But Don’t Act”

Four Lessons Of Going Long

Like Mark On Facebook or Follow On Twitter

Mark Lundegren

As mentioned in earlier posts, I’ve been at work for about a year on a book spanning my seven Natural Strategy workshops.

I’m happy to advise that the book is now fully drafted and on track to be published by 2015. All that stands between the draft and eventual publication is several months of editing and polishing on my part.

That may sound like a lot of work, but compared with writing, editing is a far more specific assignment – and even a welcome prospect, after a year of waking to blank pages each day.

With this background, I hope you will allow me to characterize writing a book as going long and to point out a few lessons from the experience. There are of course many ways of going long, and I’ll define the phrase here as any personal or group endeavor that lasts several months or more, involves change or creation, requires our full attention and pulls us from other things, and has at least a little uncertainty about how and where it will end.

Writing a book has these qualities, but many other projects do as well – creating a new product or service, cultivating an organization, taking up a social or political cause, raising a child.

Continue reading “Four Lessons Of Going Long”

Examining Our Natural Curves

Like Mark On Facebook or Follow On Twitter

Mark Lundegren

My title may have led you to think I was going to argue for or against Rubenesque body types, or discuss a fitness insight from my work at HumanaNatura. But I actually want to share a strategy insight and talk about the curves of our lives and groups, rather than those of our limbs and torsos.

Though few of us have considered the idea that our lives and social settings can have a distinct underlying curve or shape, these natural patterns do indeed exist and are discoverable by us. What we might call our life-curves are real and tangible reflections of the way we live and, in particular, how we pattern our actions against our progressive potential.

In theory and practice, life-curves prove quite powerful – in the results they create for us, when used as a tool of personal and group strategy, and as an aid to higher quality of life and functioning.

The Core Idea Of Natural Curves

The core idea of natural curves is that elemental patterns can be shown to underlie all of our lives, even as these patterns often remain hidden to us. In essence, our personal life-curve is the overall direction that our life or life trajectory takes over time – again, against our progressive or developmental potential. In practice, understanding and seeing our life-curves is a lot like learning about climate. Like the larger conditions that span and influence the weather we encounter each day. life-curves are subtle but ever-present shapes behind the scenes, but ones that are equally accessible and even equally obvious once grasped.

As a model of a critical dynamic underlying our lives – essentially our degree of natural progressivity or tendency to increase the quality of our functioning or health – life-curves describe organic forces or patterns that reflect and ultimately govern our lives in important ways. Because of this, probing these background patterns proves essential to the work of progressive modern living. And, as you will see, life-curves are shapes that reflect processes we can each sense, assess, and ultimately alter ourselves.

To introduce this insight-rich, immediately actionable, and potentially life-changing concept, I’d like to talk about three life-curves in particular. I would also like to again underscore that this simple but powerful model of life applies to groups too. Just as with individual people, organizations and communities, and even whole societies, can be seen as having a distinct and dominating curve or trajectory – one that expresses and predicts its underlying health and progressive potential.

As background, I should add that the idea our lives and the world around us have a tangible and health-impacting shape comes from my workshops and will be discussed in my first full-length book, due out in the second half of the year. As you will see, each of the three curves I will introduce implies a very different mode of modern living or collective functioning.

Continue reading “Examining Our Natural Curves”

Your Organization’s Health

Like Mark On Facebook or Follow On Twitter

Mark LundegrenIf I were to ask about the health of the organization you run or work for, how would you think about this idea?

You might understand my question as referring to the physical health of your workers or co-workers, or the level of daily stress that is typical. You may initially see my question in terms of the demands your organization makes on its members, and whether it leaves time for life outside of work.

All of these considerations are of course important aspects of healthy modern life and work, but they really don’t answer the question of how healthy the organization is, as an entity unto itself (understanding that any organization’s health influences and is impacted by the health of real people).

But just as with real people, organizations can be seen as relatively and thus comparatively healthy or unhealthy – as existing on an organizational health continuum – once we examine and broaden our thinking about the basic nature of all forms or expressions of the important quality we call health.

Three Definitions Of Health

I would encourage you to stop and spend a minute thinking about health as a natural quality of living things – be they living individuals, groups, or even whole societies – and to craft a simple definition of health.

Don’t be disappointed if you can’t come up with a good working definition right away. In truth, even among people whose job it is to think about and advance health – including physicians but also other professionals in various fields – we frequently fail to reach a full and enduring sense of what health is in its essence.

Continue reading “Your Organization’s Health”

Understanding Effectiveness

Like Mark On Facebook or Follow On Twitter

Mark LundegrenWe all know the perils of being merely efficient. It’s not hard to think of an example of ourselves acting quickly or even expertly, only to find that our actions were not ideal for a situation. For this reason, the goal of effectiveness is generally a better one than simple efficiency, if we want to maximize the value of our efforts.

This fairly uncomplicated idea of course begs us to understand the nature of effectiveness, and I encounter people and groups all the time who struggle with this important concept. But as is the case with many complex phenomena, there is a simple way to think about effectiveness that can unlock our ability to both understand and achieve it. And this ability is true regardless of whether we are considering the effectiveness of  groups and organizations or ourselves and others.

To demystify effectiveness and make the concept immediately clearer and more actionable, we need only consider three variables: 1) a need or want, 2) time, and 3) cost. All three variables are pretty straightforward, and there is no nuanced understanding of these words required. More than likely, how you intuitively understand needs and wants, time, and cost are adequate for unlocking new effectiveness in your life and work. The trick is thinking about these things together and the ways in which they naturally inter-relate.

As part of this new perspective, we simultaneously learn to better differentiate between needs and wants, and tasks. This important distinction lies at the heart of the difference between efficiency and effectiveness, and can be used to promote transformative impacts in our lives and organizations.

Continue reading “Understanding Effectiveness”